Twaweza.org

Welcome to Twaweza

Twaweza means “we can make it happen” in Swahili. Twaweza works on enabling children to learn, citizens to exercise agency and governments to be more open and responsive in Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda. We have programs, staff and offices across all three countries, and a world respected practice of learning, monitoring and evaluation. Our flagship programs include Uwezo, Africa’s largest annual citizen assessment to assess children’s learning levels across hundreds of thousands of households, and Sauti za Wananchi, Africa’s first nationally representative mobile phone survey.  We undertake effective public and policy engagement, through powerful media partnerships and global leadership of initiatives such as the Open Government Partnership. Read more.

Frankly speaking: Ugandans’ opinions and experiences of information and the media

7 out of 10 think that radio and television stations should be free to produce their own news programs (68%); and a similar number (72%) think that the news media should investigate and report on government mistakes and corruption. Read more...

Positive Deviance: the search for a magic pill

Positive deviance: uncommon but successful (in addressing a particular problem) and replicable behaviours that enable people to find better solutions than their neighbours who face the same challenges and have access to the same resources. Read more...

Bringing ideas and evidence to light

New ideas and the latest evidence from Twaweza summarized into handy blog posts coming out of our recent Evidence and Ideas event. Read more...

Uwezo Learning Assessment adapted to Refugee contexts 2017

Uwezo Uganda piloted the Uwezo Learning Assessment in four refugee hosting districts of Adjumani, Arua, Isingiro and Yumbe and generated data on learning outcomes (literacy and numeracy) in both refugee and non-refugee settlements in these areas. Read more...

Not to that extent? Tanzanians’ views on information and public debate

The majority of citizens do not feel free to criticise the President (60%), the Vice President (54%) and the Prime Minister (51%). Close to half also do not feel free to criticise Ministers (47%), Regional Commissioners (46%) and District Commissione... Read more...

Learning note 13| A twist on performance theory

To understand better the mechanisms of how an individual-performance based initiative KiuFunza interacted with the school’s collective, we conducted in-depth qualitative research in the 10 schools participating in KiuFunza in the Mbozi district in ... Read more...

Sauti Za Wananchi series | Not to that extent?

Sauti za Wananchi is presenting the most recently available nationally representative data around Tanzanians’ views on information and public debate. Read more...

Looking for support in Developing the Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy and Guidelines

Twaweza is seeking the services of a consultant to develop the child protection and safeguarding policies and procedures in program implementation. Read more...

Lessons from Uwezo learning assessments 2011 to 2015

On average, enrolment rates are generally high in all three countries, but emerging evidence indicates that fewer children are being enrolled in school. Read more...

Latest publications

Sauti za Wananchi


Highlighted


  • Ideas & Evidence event on 6-7 March 2018: In our position as one of the prominent independent, civil society voices in Tanzania and the region, this event is a continuation of our open conversation on knowledge, information, evidence, citizen agen... Read more...


  • Citizens' views on political leadership based on the most recent nationally representative data available. Read more...


  • Are teachers in East Africa's primary schools actually teaching? And do they understand their subject matter? Revealing new charts using data from a World Bank survey examine these questions. Read more...