Twaweza.org

Welcome to Twaweza

Twaweza means “we can make it happen” in Swahili. Twaweza works on enabling children to learn, citizens to exercise agency and governments to be more open and responsive in Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda. We have programs, staff and offices across all three countries, and a world respected practice of learning, monitoring and evaluation. Our flagship programs include Uwezo, Africa’s largest annual citizen assessment to assess children’s learning levels across hundreds of thousands of households, and Sauti za Wananchi, Africa’s first nationally representative mobile phone survey.  We undertake effective public and policy engagement, through powerful media partnerships and global leadership of initiatives such as the Open Government Partnership. Read more.

Analysis of Online Content Regulations

Twaweza, independently and alongside our partners in the Coalition on the Right to Information, submitted analyses to the Ministry of Information, Culture, Arts and Sports on proposed Online Content Regulations (2017). Read more...

Analysis of Broadcast Content Regulations

Twaweza submitted analysis to the Ministry of Information, Culture, Arts and Sports on the Broadcast Content Regulations (2017). Read more...

Ideas & Evidence @ Twaweza East Africa

Ideas & Evidence event on 6-7 March 2018: In our position as one of the prominent independent, civil society voices in Tanzania and the region, this event is a continuation of our open conversation on knowledge, information, evidence, citizen agen... Read more...

Broadcasting, policing, human rights and “sedition” in Tanzania

The Act states in article 57 that “a person shall not be prosecuted for any seditious offence under this Act unless with a written consent of the Director of Public Prosecutions. Read more...

On “sedition”, the law is clear. So what is the TCRA doing?

This begs this first fundamental question: How can the TCRA legitimately penalise five TV stations for “seditious” broadcasts when “sedition” is not mentioned in the relevant enabling law? Read more...

Are we safer? Kenyans’ views on security, policing and extremism

Kenyans are slightly more optimistic about the security situation compared to last year. Four out of ten (42%) say the security situation in their area has improved over the past three months, compared to 38% who said the same in 2016. Read more...

Partially Protected: The state of civic space in Kenya

In August 2010, Kenya adopted a new constitution that was hailed globally as progressive due to the rights and freedoms that it guaranteed Kenyans. However, it does not automatically follow that such guarantees will be respected in practice. Read more...

KiuFunzaII: teacher performance pay improves early-grade learning outcomes

After a two year trial, Twaweza, in collaboration with COSTECH and Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA), has shown that cash on delivery (or performance pay) for teachers can significantly improve learning outcomes. Read more...

Sauti za Wananchi launched in Uganda

The majority of Ugandans name health as one of the three most pressing challenges for the country (59%) and their own household (55%). Similarly, 65% of citizens think the government is managing health services badly. And many citizens (46%) report b... Read more...

Latest publications

Sauti za Wananchi


Highlighted


  • Ideas & Evidence event on 6-7 March 2018: In our position as one of the prominent independent, civil society voices in Tanzania and the region, this event is a continuation of our open conversation on knowledge, information, evidence, citizen agen... Read more...


  • Citizens' views on political leadership based on the most recent nationally representative data available. Read more...


  • Are teachers in East Africa's primary schools actually teaching? And do they understand their subject matter? Revealing new charts using data from a World Bank survey examine these questions. Read more...